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High-performance fighter aircraft

Military

Healthcare

Speech recognition.

Theorem proving.

 

Automated theorem proving (ATP or automated deduction) is a subfield of automated reasoning dealing with proving mathematical theorems by computer programs. Automated reasoning over mathematical proof was a major impetus for the development of computer science.

 

In computer science, speech recognition (SR) is the translation of spoken words into text. It is also known as "automatic speech recognition, "ASR, "computer speech recognition", "speech to text", or just "STT". Some SR systems use "training where an individual speaker reads sections of text into the SR system. These systems analyze the person's specific voice and use it to fine tune the recognition of that person's speech, resulting in more accurate transcription. Systems that do not use training are called "Speaker Independent" systems. Systems that use training are called "Speaker Dependent" systems.

Speech recognition applications include voice user interfaces such as voice dialing, call routing, domotic appliance control, search, simple data entry, preparation of structured documents, speech-to-text processing ( ), and aircraft.

The term voice recognition refers to finding the identity of "who" is speaking, rather than what they are saying. Recognizing the speaker can simplify the task of translating speech in systems that have been trained on specific person's voices or it can be used to authenticate or verify the identity of a speaker as part of a security process.

 

In the health care domain, speech recognition can be implemented in front- end or back-end of the medical documentation process. Front-End speech recognition is where the provider dictates into a speech-recognition engine, the recognized words are displayed as they are spoken, and the dictator is responsible for editing and signing off on the document. Back-End or deferred speech recognition is where the provider dictates into a digital dictation system, the voice is routed through a speech-recognition machine and the recognized draft document is routed along with the original voice file to the editor, where the draft is edited and report finalised.

 

Substantial efforts have been devoted in the last decade to the test and evaluation of speech recognition in fighter aircraft. Of particular note is the U.S. program in speech recognition for the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI)/F-16 aircraft (F-16 VISTA), and a program in France installing speech recognition systems on Mirage aircraft, and also programs in the UK dealing with a variety of aircraft platforms. In these programs, speech recognizers have been operated successfully in fighter aircraft, with applications including: setting radio frequencies, commanding an autopilot system, setting steer-point coordinates and weapons release parameters, and controlling flight display.

The Eurofighter Typhoon currently in service with the UK RAF employs a speaker-dependent system, i.e. it requires each pilot to create a template. The system is not used for any safety critical or weapon critical tasks, such as weapon release or lowering of the undercarriage, but is used for a wide range of other cockpit functions. Voice commands are confirmed by visual and/or aural feedback. The system is seen as a major design feature in the reduction of pilot workload, and even allows the pilot to assign targets to himself with two simple voice commands or to any of his wingmen with only five commands.

 

Training air traffic controllers ()

Training for air traffic controllers (ATC) represents an excellent application for speech recognition systems. Many ATC training systems currently require a person to act as a "pseudo-pilot, engaging in a voice dialog with the trainee controller, which simulates the dialog that the controller would have to conduct with pilots in a real ATC situation. Speech recognition and synthesis techniques offer the potential to eliminate the need for a person to act as pseudo-pilot, thus reducing training and support personnel. In theory, Air controller tasks are also characterized by highly structured speech as the primary output of the controller, hence reducing the difficulty of the speech recognition task should be possible. In practice, this is rarely the case.

 

Telephony and other domains

Automatic Speech Recognition in the field of telephony is now commonplace and in the field of computer gaming and simulation is becoming more widespread. Despite the high level of integration with word processing in general personal computing. However, ASR in the field of document production has not seen the expected increases in use.

 


:

  1. Aircraft Armament
  2. Aircraft Armament
  3. Lesson 27 Aircraft Armament and Materiel




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